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Acotations (Antivirus)

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Acotations (Antivirus)

Post  carlos13fa on Mon Oct 31, 2011 11:20 am

Firewalls
by
Alexander Khodenko
Acotations:
Firewall is defined as a linkage in a network which relays only those data packets that are clearly intended for and authorized to reach the other side. Firewalls are helpful in keeping computers safe from intentional cracker attacks and from hardware failures occurring elsewhere.
The performance of a firewall is similar to that of a physical wall that helps to keep fire from spreading. A firewall is a program or a hardware device that filters the incoming pockets of information.
Types of Firewalls
Firewalls can be classified by technology and by intended application. There are four types of firewalls classified by technology:
1. Packet Filtering
2. Circuit Gateways
3. Application Proxies
4. Hybrid



Bibliography


Curtin, C. Matthew (2001, July 02). Internet Firewalls: Frequently Asked Questions [Message – ID: 9hpldl$3r2$1@news.cis.ohio-state.edu]. Message posted to http://www.faqs.org/faqs/firewalls-faq/
Downing, D., Covington, M., & Covington M. M. (2000). Dictionary of Computer Internet Terms. New York: Barron’s Educational Series, Inc.
How Stuff Works. (1998-2003). How Firewalls Work. Retrieved February 02, 2003, from http://computer.howstuffworks.com/firewall.htm/printable
ICSA Lab. (2003). Types of Firewalls. Retrieved March 30, 2003, from http://www.icsalabs.com/html/communities/firewalls/buyers guide2001/chap 2.shtml
ICSA Lab. (2003). Common Pitfalls of Firewall Deployment and How to Avoid Them. Retrieved March 30, 2003, from http://www.icsalabs.com/html/communities/firewalls/buyers guide2001/chap 5.shtml
Reed, B.A. (2003). The DMZ Zone Explained. Retrieved April 17, 2003, from http://www.firewalls.com/document-dmz.asp
Sygate Technologies. (2003). Sygate Product Documentation. Retrieved March 13, 2003, from http://soho.sygate.com/support/documentation.htm
Vicomsoft. (2003). KnowledgeShare-White Papers. Retrieved February 16, 2003, from http://www.vicomsoft.com/knowledge/reference/firewalls.html

http://khodenko.tripod.com/Firewalls/index.htm


A General Definition of Malware
(SRM Seminar)
Simon Kramer
(j.w.w. Julian C. Bradfield, U Edinburgh)
University of Luxembourg
Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Chennai
May 17, 2010
Acotations:
What is malware?
malware = malicious software
￿ Malicious intention is not generally directly observable!
￿ How to distinguish unawareness (juvenile hacking, accidental
anti-hacking) from malice?
- Users don’t care: all that matters is (harmful) effect, not
(malicious) intention.
- Malice is immaterial!
-psychological “definition”

Bibliography

F. Cohen.
Computer viruses: Theory and experiments.
Journal of Computers & Security, 6, 1987.
L. Adleman.
An abstract theory of computer viruses.
In Proceedings of CRYPTO’88, volume 403 of LNCS, 1988.
G. Bonfante, M. Kaczmarek, and J.-Y. Marion.
On abstract computer virology from a recursion theoretic
perspective.
Journal in Computer Virology, 1(3–4), 2006.
E. Filiol, M. Helenius, and S. Zanero.
Open problems in computer virology.
Journal in Computer Virology, 1(3–4), 2006.
S. Kramer and J.C. Bradfield.
A general definition of malware.
Journal in Computer Virology, Online First, 2009.
http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11416-009-0137-1
J.C. Bradfield and C. Stirling.
Handbook of Modal Logic, volume 3 of Studies in Logic and
Practical Reasoning, chapter Modal Mu-Calculi.
Elsevier, 2007.
http://satoss.uni.lu/seminars/srm/pdfs/2011-Simon-Kramer.pdf

Virus
Acotations:
Virus Origins
Computer viruses are called viruses because they share some of the traits of biological viruses. A computer virus passes from computer to computer like a biological virus passes from person to person.
Unlike a cell, a virus has no way to reproduce by itself. Instead, a biological virus must inject its DNA into a cell. The viral DNA then uses the cell's existing machinery to reproduce itself. In some cases, the cell fills with new viral particles until it bursts, releasing the virus. In other cases, the new virus particles bud off the cell one at a time, and the cell remains alive.

Bibliography
Internet Source:

“Computer Virus.” How stuff Works. March 1st < www.howstuffworks.com/virus.htm >.

“What is a Computer Virus?” MSBC. March 1st <msbc.msn.com/id/29719417>.

“What is a Computer Virus?” Microsoft. March 1st <www.microsoft.com/nz/protect/computer/baisics/virus/mspx>.

“Computer Virus.” Microsoft. March 1st <support.microsoft.com/kb/129972.html>.

“Computer Virus.” Nasa. March 1st <ksnn.larc.nasa.gov/webtext.cfn?unit=virus>.


Encyclopedia

“Computer Virus.” KidsSearch. March 1st <http://web.ebscohost.com/srck5/detail?vid=3&hid=102&sid=b8236f75-2268-4885-853e-7d65c987ba93%40sessionmgr104&bdata=JnNpdGU9c3JjazUtbGl2ZQ%3d%3d#db=funk&AN=CO191550%23db=funk&AN=CO191550>


Interview

Peter Backer, E-mail, 18 Feb 2010.
http://cvirustips.webs.com/bibliography.htm

lol!

carlos13fa

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